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10 Historic Landmarks to visit in Argyll

Argyll is steeped in ancient history, with an abundance of incredible architecture and design, so what better time to explore all that the area has to offer. We’ve picked out 10 landmarks that are well worth a visit before the year is out.

14 Sep 2020

    • There's so much to do in Argyll
    • Exclusive discounts available
    • Embrace the local history

    Auchindrain Township

    Auchindrain Township

    Located just south of Inveraray sits Auchindrain Township - the last of Scotland’s Farming Township’s and an important example of Scotland’s history. Enjoy a stroll around the settlement or browse a range of local crafts and souvenirs. Argyll Holidays guests enjoy 20% off admission.

    Castle House Museum

    Castle House Museum

    No trip to Hunters Quay is complete without a visit to the Castle House Museum. Set in well-maintained gardens, offering excellent views of the Firth of Clyde and surrounding hills, The Castle House is one of Dunoon’s most historic locations, offering a deep knowledge of the local history, along with dedicated tours. Putting and tennis is also available.

    Dunollie Castle & Museum

    Dunollie Castle & Museum

    Dunollie Castle is a four-star visitor attraction based in Oban and is an iconic monument known throughout Argyll. The Clan Chiefs and Lords of Lorne ruled the majority of Argyll and the Isles from here for more than 1,000 years, and it remains the ancestral home of Clan MacDougall to this day. Whilst visiting, take a moment to admire the incredible views outside over the Western Ocean. 

    Inveraray Castle

    Inveraray Castle

    Towering at the edge of the quaint town of Inveraray, this iconic Castle is the ancestral home of the Duke of Argyll, Chief of the Clan Campbell and a must-see visitor attraction on the West Coast of Scotland. Once inside, visitors can marvel at the lavish state dining room, tapestries and the stunning Armoury Hall. The castle’s beautifully maintained garden and estate offers wonderful walking opportunities, with unrivalled views across Loch Fyne.  Argyll Holidays guests can enjoy exclusive discounts of 20% off entry by flashing their accommodation key.

    Inveraray Jail

    Inveraray Jail 

    Stepping through the doors of Inveraray Jail is stepping back in time to a 19th-century prison. Experience what life was like for the men, women and children who were locked up here. Explore the historic buildings and meet the costumed characters who animate the past in this unique living museum. Argyll Holidays guests can redeem 20% off entry - book online with discount code ARGYLLCUSTOMER.

    Rothesay Castle

    Rothesay Castle

    Rothesay Castle is on the stunning island of Bute, accessible by a short ferry ride from Colintraive, which is only a 30-minute drive from Hunters Quay.  It was built by the Stewart family in the early 13th century to defend against invading Vikings and has a unique circular curtain wall, one-of-its-kind for Scotland. Step inside the great hall in the gatehouse, restored in 1900, to see displays about the castle, or walk around the moat to view the stone wall in all its glory.

    Kilchurn Castle

    Kilchurn Castle

    The remains of Kilchurn Castle perch on a rocky peninsula at the northeast end of Loch Awe, on the main road from Inveraray to Oban. It was first constructed in the 15th century as the base of the Campbells of Glen Orchy but fell out of use and was in ruins by 1770.  It is now open to the public in the summer months, and well worth checking out, even if for a stunning photograph glancing at the Castle from across the loch.

    Tarbert Castle

    Tarbert Castle

    Situated on the Kintyre Peninsula, overlooking Loch Fyne, sits the ruins of Tarbert Castle. It’s easily accessible by a scenic drive through Inveraray (for Drimsynie Estate guests), or a short ferry crossing from Portavadie (ideal if you’re staying at Hunters Quay). The castle holds national importance because of the role which Robert the Bruce played in its reinforcement back in the 1300’s. Not only is it open all year, but it’s also free to visit, making it an excellent spot for a family picnic.

    Historic Kilmun

    Historic Kilmun

    Just a few miles from Hunters Quay, The Argyll Mausoelum is located adjacent to Kilmun Church on the shores of the Holy Loch. The area is steeped in history, with the earliest known people settling here around 3500 BC. The 6th century Columban monk Fintan Munnu (Mun) built his chapel here; the Vikings explored here; there was a thriving medieval community; and the Victorian wealthy built their villas. People have been making their mark here for centuries and it’s the ideal destination to embrace the local history.

    St Conan's Kirk

    St Conan’s Kirk

    Nested on the banks of Loch Awe, Saint Conan’s Kirk is steeped in a family history, unconventional approaches to design and magical and almost unbelievable stories that surprise and delight those of every age. It has been providing the local community and visitors alike with an enchanting experience for many years. Tours are available and the Gatehouse Tearoom offers tea, coffees, home baking, light lunches and a range of crafts.

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